News & Events

  • Dartmouth College is seeking a Teaching Laboratories Technician, who will work in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, supporting the undergraduate teaching labs and other department needs, setting up labs, maintaining computers, equipment, and lab rooms, building lab replacement parts, ordering equipment, overseeing students filming classes, editing and processing video files, assisting the lab manager with developing new labs, supporting professors and staff with technical problems,...

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  • Astronomy Seminar
    Thursday, October 15, 2015
    10:00 am, Wilder 202

    Allison Kirkpatrick
    University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    Title: "What Lies Beneath: Dust Obscured Star Formation and Black Hole Growth"

    Abstract:
    The evolution of massive dusty galaxies is driven internally by AGN growth and star formation, but due to the copious amounts of dust, it is often impossible to observe these processes directly. Instead, we must disentangle information about...

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  • Neutrinos are elusive, shape-shifting subatomic particles—probably  the smallest particles in the universe. They are quintessentially Star Trek and also the stuff of real science. They even won a Nobel Prize for two physicists this year. Several Dartmouth faculty share their thoughts on the mystery of neutrinos. Read more...

  • Officials from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Weather Service (NWS) this fall presented the College with an Honored Institution Award for delivering, monitoring, and reporting data to the NWS. Read more...

  • After seven balloon launches in the bright Arctic sun, the BARREL team, led by Dartmouth's Robyn Millan, has returned home from a 4-week campaign in Kiruna, Sweden, north of the Arctic Circle. Read more...

  • As many of you may know, this Sunday the 27th is going to be a full lunar eclipse!  The Dartmouth Public Observing is going to have a special event on the green to make sure we get a fantastic view of this rare astronomical event!  The moon will begin to pass into the earth's penumbra at around 9pm, fully entering the umbra a little after 10pm. Telescopes will be set up starting at 8:45 for the best viewing as the moon turns a deep red color.  Tell your friends and classmates...

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  • Title: Type II Solar Radio Bursts: From Fundamental Plasma Physics to Space Weather Research  (Video)

    Abstract: For over 60 years type II solar radio bursts have defied detailed quantitative explanation, despite their promise for predicting spaceweather at Earth and their status as the archetype for coherent radio emission stimulated by...

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  • New undergraduate students should visit the new student page for more information on choosing courses, general information about the department and a link to the Dartmouth Physics Society

  • McKinley Brumback came from Maryland a year ago to join the Physics and Astronomy department where she is seeking her PhD in Astronomy. She has just completed her first year research project with Professor Robert Fesen analyzing images taken of young supernova remnant Cassiopeia A with a ground based telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope. McKinley shares her thoughts on her first year as a PhD student in the department as...

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  • Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs) result from  large-scale waves in the upper atmosphere somewhat analogous to ocean waves, though propagating internal to the medium rather than on the surface. By transporting energy  they play a role in determining the temperature profile of the upper atmosphere. They also affect radio signals propagating through and beneath the ionosphere. Dartmouth students are involved in operating radio receivers in at least four sites in the northeastern...

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